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>> and i have the right to petition the courts if the don't agree with a law. we are not going to all agree with every law that is passed. i don't agree with the laws that restrict contraception use now being put forth in different states around the country. i feel like those infringe on my rights as well. >> nothing infringes on your rights. >> you don't have to work at hobby lobby. economicception is an check issue for many women. >> this is about forcing the employer to give it to you for free. >> happy new. >> sean: and we continue to monitor here on the fox news channel america on the brink. the latest on the fiscal cliff. let not your heart be troubled. that is all the time we have left but greta is standing by >> the o'reilly factor is on. tonight: >> somewhat like taking your child hostage and saying to somebody else i'm going to shoot my child if you don't do what i want done. >> as the country moves closer to going over the fiscal cliff, the partisan rhetoric reaches new lows. can washington hammer out a deal before it's too late. the american people should be outrage
in a couple of days, the losses of every american's paycheck will get a lot smaller. -- the law assays that every american's paycheck will get a little smaller. but congress can prevent it from happening, if they act now. we may be able to reach an agreement that can pass both houses in time. but if an agreement is not reached on time, then i will urge the senate to hold an upward bound to vote on a basic package that protects the middle class from an income tax hike, extends vital unemployment insurance for americans looking for a job, and lays the groundwork for future progress. such a proposal could pass both houses with bipartisan majorities, as long as these leaders allow to come to a vote. if they still want to vote no, that is their prerogative. but they should let everybody else vote as well. that is the way this is supposed to work. we cannot afford a politically self-inflicted wound to our economy. the economy is growing. the folks you sent to washington have to do their jobs. the housing market is healing, but that could stall if folks are seeing smaller paychecks. unemploym
city's brooklyn bridge last night. they want tighter gun laws in the country. several hundred people are said to have participated in the march. carrying candles, they stopped in the middle ever the bridge to read the names of the children and adults killed at sandy hook elementary school in connecticut. the school shooting has prompted renewed debate about gun control. legislators and the nra stood their ground on sunday morning talk shows. jessica doyle is here with the latest. good morning, jess. >> good morning to you, andrea. of course good morning to everybody at home. we definitely are seeing the drumbeat for tougher gun controls getting louder in the wake of course of newtown. we saw that on the sunday morning talk shows yesterday. among many other places in the wake of this tragedy, but advocates for tougher laws are running head first into gun rights lawmakers as well as the national rifle association. that's not stopping lawmakers like senator dianne feinstein of california who is vowing to renew legislation to ban certain weapons and limit the number of bullets a magazine
the government and law enforcement officers could read your e-mails. and they won't need your permission. so what are your rights and what do you need to know. nice to see you. >> it is early. >> yes, it is early. >> all of this started with a bill that would give people a right to post on facebook which videos they were watching. >> what happened is way back in 1986 they were supposed to protect everyone. then in 1988 you had the video protection act. here's what the problem is those bills were passed during the reagan administration. the way we store the way we use information has vastly changed. the process was we would update this film congress says this we would have something that is a little more consumer friendly to address our present day usage and needs. did it happen did it not in some prerespects it did some it did not. e-mails over 6 months old they are considered abandoned. what does that mean? the government doesn't need probable cause they don't need they send a request saying we are conducting a little investigation give up the information and as a result of that these third part
and better from my perspective, he's not the nominee to begin with. >> rush limbaugh did call a law student a slut and a prostitute for wanting to have insurance covered for her contraception. i presume you wouldn't view what as absurd or entertaining, you'd view that as pretty offensive. >> of course not. of course, as i said before. i want to spend my time talking about how we can grow the economy. what i'd like to talk about which is offensive, which is governor romney out there for almost a year telling the people in the republican primary that he never advocated that romneycare would be a federal model, that he never advocated for an individual mandate that government at the federal level require people to buy insurance. now we find on several occasions just in the past week article after article, interview after interview where governor romney did just that in 2009. now, to me that's offensive. >> is he a liar then? >> well, this goes to the snobbish issue, which is he clearly did not tell the truth, that you don't necessarily go and, you know, accuse the person on a personal level, y
. they have passed only 219 bills into law making it 100 bills behind the 104th congress who until now has been the most do-nothing of the do-nothing congress congresses. with this, it is no problem to predict the answer to howie mandel's question, no deal. soon to be ex-congressman jason altmeyer who is leaving the establishment. >> good to be here. >> can you tell us, since you are soon to leave that building why your colleagues cannot come to a deal on this issue? >> if you look at the political structure in washington, it is divided government and that is what american people vote for most of the time, and you have a house leadership in particular that has a conference that they represent that is almost evenly split between hard-line conservative tea party-type members and more pro business and anti-tax, and i would say more thoughtful members on issues like this, and then of course, the president sitting down at the other end of pennsylvania avenue, and on the senate, it looks like they are starting to work together better than we are in the house, and that is where the deal will be s
as antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that , you have a certain risk factor. was it reall
cannot take a present. it is against the law and they said, well open the box and take a look at it. outcomes this little watch and on the back they have for dean we love you the sinatras. you can't give it back to us. >> after writing this letter to fbi director j edgar hoover ellison was allowed to keep the watch. the day after sinatra's birthday the case was cracked wide open when irwin confessed his involvement to his brother within hours keenan and ansler were also in custody. >> three men were arrested including barry keenan a 23-year-old unemployed sales rep. most of the money small bills was recovered. >> besides giving money for the not teen torrance was never charged. >> when their trial began in 1964 the defense took the strategy of blaming the victim to dizzyying new heights. >> it was keenan who defied their defense. >> every time i talked to a lawyer it was are you sure this wasn't a publicity stunt? everybody was sure it was a publicity stunt. that gave me theidea. >> all three had near own lawyers john irwin's attorney was the flamboyant gladys root known for wearing
extreme mental illness with several rights laws is a deeper issue than gun control. >host: how should vice president joe biden and the white house address this. mental illness is part of the debate and will be part of the solution. >> i think they really need to look at civil rights laws and be able to intervene more aggressively with mental health professionals when people show a consistent pattern of mental illness. i think you can travel through any city in america and see massive amounts of people who are not capable of taking care of themselves. as a society, we are not humanitarian when we leave them to defend themselves. >host: this argument is not new. it is highlighted in the extensive report in "the washington post." the chair of the senate judiciary committee, joe biden, we will hear from him. the witness testifies and next to him is sarah brady whose husband was shot during the reagan assassination attempt back in 1981, jim brady. still law was named after him. let's take you back to that hearing -- [video clip] >> life is completely shattered. my daughter's life is completely
. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year perio
there, you have to enforce the law. but you have now, and i don't blame people who show up here. if we refuse to control the border and identify who you are and refuse to police ourselves refuse to do everything if you're here illegally, it's hard for me to tell you you're or taken advantage of the richest venture in the world. he seems to be saying please come and exploit me. to some extent we have to reestablish the rule of law. the only point to try to make during the debate that had a significant impact on our side in solidifying the degree to which people adopt positions that made no sense. two points. one is for not going to deport grandmother's. some of you may disagree with that, but if you look at this country as a whole, the idea behind grandmother's, the churches will protect them. their families will protect them. and they cannot pin. conservatives should not write laws that are fantasies. i didn't say i'm for people who come here illegally, but i'm prefiguring out a patch of residency to get them to pay taxes, get them to be within the law, get them to be not exploited and
lawmakers seemed close to becoming law until jeanne boehner walked away from the deal and tried to yankee laterally pass his own bill which he called, somewhat weirdly, plan b, to raise taxes on over 100 million and suspend all leeming cuts. that plan blew up in boehner's face, however, when he couldn't get enough votes from his own caucus to pass it. here's boehner, the day after pulling the bill from the floor. >> because of the political divide in the country, because of the divide here in washington, trying to bridge these differences has been difficult. while we may have not been able to get the votes last night, to avert 99.81% of the tax increases, i don't think -- they weren't taking that out on me. they were dealing with the perception that somebody might accuse them of raising taxes. >> probably because he's asking them to vote for raising taxes. later on friday, president obama reiterated he wants to reach a broad compromise to cut the deficit so social security cuts remain on the table but in the mean time, the president proposed his own plan b, to extend the bush tax cuts on
with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really t
of becoming law. that is what i said back on july 25. we allow that vote and i said we knew it did not pass constitutional muster and that democrats would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires if they were serious and as i called on them to do last week. the so-called senate bill is no more than a glorified sense of the senate revolution. let's put that talking point aside. host: mitch mcconnell -- or is a story from politico.com, "why they will not go over the cliff." "they see an advantage in negotiating with republicans that will feel free not to raise taxes once the rates have gone out. the president is pulling in the mid 50's. there is still time for the dynamic to shift. speed banner will stress the house has passed legislation to avert the entire fiscal cliff. there is an ad we want to point out in "the new york times" and "the washington post." together" rds "come as a way to send a message to congress. "the struggle of today is for a vast future also." the words of abraham lincoln. jim from georgia on the republican line. caller: thank
law? and, later, is the tea party movement just about finished? that's what the "new york times" says and we'll hear from both sides. we hope you stay tuned to those reports. check our bags for free, thanks to our explorer card. then, the united club. my motr was so wrong about you. next, we get priory boarding on our flight i booked with miles. all because of the card. and me. okay, what's the plan? plan? mm-hmm. we're on vacation. there is no plan. really? [ male announcer ] the united mileageplus explorer card. the mileage card with speci perks on united. get it and you're in. smoke? nah, i'm good. ♪ [ male announcer ] every time you say no to a cigarette, you celebrate a little win. nicoderm cq, the patch with time release smart control technology that acts fast and helps control cravings all day long. ♪ quit one day at a time with nicoderm cq. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choo any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a ful
said the group would not support any new gun laws in this country. good morning this monday, december 24, 2012. we will begin this morning with your thoughts on religion and politics. as a religion influence your political decisions? also send us your tweet if you go to twitter.com -- we will begin with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your thoughts on this december 24, 2012. it does religion influence your politics? let me show you this from "the new york times" this morning. a new poll out worldwide religion shows up that one out of six follows no religion. that is worldwide. all religions outside the united states as well. the upi story. religious identity affect voter choice. and then on the 2012 election, here is the pew forum on religion and public policy -- dorothy and baltimore, maryland. independent caller. what do you think? does religion
. for some states, it's a day that a series of new laws are going to take effect. let me get you clued in here. in california, talking more than 800 new laws, including one requiring apartments and condos to install carbon monoxide detectors. separately, employers will no longer be able to ask job applicants for log ins to social media accounts, such as facebook and twitter. and the increase between 28 cents and 37 cents per hour affects more than 1 million low-income earners. thanks to laws that have lower minimum wage to keep price. and the price of stamps is set to go up? e, again, by a penny, on january 27th, which brings the price of sending first-class mail to 46 cents. >>> well, the senate has also approved a five-year extension of the foreign intelligence surveillance act allowinging the government to eavesdrop on overseas phone calls and e-mails from potential terrorists. they say it's protected us from more attacks like 9/11. others argue the bill could be abused. the bill is being sent to president obama and he is expected to sign it. >>> and the state's same-sex marriage la
governor rick snyder has signed into law a measure allowing michigan areas to declare bankruptcy or fall under the control of an unelected emergency manager enabled to fire public officials and nullify union contracts. state republicans approved it this month after voters repealed a similar initiative on election day. despite reimposing a measure that was rejected by popular vote, governor snyder said -- was among a number of controversial bills recently advanced by state republicans in michigan before their majority declines with a new legislative session next month. the chicago teachers union has filed a lawsuit accusing a city of discriminating against african-american teachers and staff through its effort to reform or shut down local schools. the federal suit says more than half of the tenured teachers who lost their jobs in the most recent wave of school closings were african-american, despite african-americans comprising just 30% of tenured teachers overall and 35% in the underperforming schools that wound up -- wind up being closed. the teachers' union is seeking an injunction to
investigated by washington, d.c. police. cops want to know if he violated d.c. gun laws. the reason is this exchange sunday between gregory and the executive vice president of the national rifle association, wayne lapierre. watch. >> here is a magazine for ammunition that carries 30 bullets. isn't it possible that if we got rid of these, if we replace them and said, you can only have a magazine that carries five bullets or ten bullets, isn't it just possible that we could reduce the carnage in a situation like newtown. >> i don't believe that's going to make one difference. >> police want to know whether the 30-round magazine gregory displayed was real or fake. because possessing a large capacity ammunition device is illegal in the district of columbia, where nbc studios are located. even if it is not attached to the weapon. now, police department spokesperson said nbc asked if it could use the high capacity magazine on air, and it was told no. the network has not responded to cnn's request for comment. >>> next, celebrities who are putting the spotlight on giving. see how actor mat
was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. -- david corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that, you ha
price. >> we have that with current epa. >> with the current epa laws. >> it's a de-facto to us. >> let's say we have that. what does that do to growth? what does that do to -- is that compatible with the continued growth of the american economy because the problem is, with juliet, what you said before, countries take a huge economic nosedive. the problem in selling it is precisely going around and telling people, hey, great news. we're going to tank the economy. >> i am actually a technology ee van gentlem evangelist. i think an economy with bright innovators, which happens to be the case with the united states, i think you can effective do what germany has done and actually having a high tax is not a problem, right? one of the central political problems in the united states is you have to raise tax revenue. why not raise tax revenue from a part of the economy where you want to discourage activity and use that for education. >> the private sector is sitting on more uninvested cash. this is not stock, not money given to owners. >> firms sitting on cash waiting to invest. they are waitin
of these people trying to leave the in-laws house. >> rick: we learned the other day that gretchen loves her in-laws. >> gretchen: exactly, because there was a study and the mother-in-law takes the hit. >> rick: there must be a few people who say i can only handle three days of her. i can't go home -- >> gretchen: are you going to help them out. >> rick: you might have to spend four or five days there, get ready. find some way tie a break. there will be really big storms. >> gretchen: let's talk about this morning with an extreme weather alert. deadly storm system that slammed the midwest, snow and tornadoes heading northeast this morning. >> oh, my god, look. that's a tornado. oh, wow. oh, jesus, look at that tornado. >> gretchen: so that tornado spotted in mobile, alabama. am i saying that correctly? >> rick: yeah. mobile. >> gretchen: okay, good. one of the hardest hit cities, tens of thousands of people there waking up the day after christmas now without power. >> when it calmed down, we looked and everything seemed green, like it was popping off transformers left and right. we heard a noise. i
will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, y
to serve. i just served my mother-in-law your chicken noodle soup but she loved it so much... i told her it was homemade. everyone tells a little white lie now and then. but now she wants my recipe [ clears his throat ] [ softly ] she's right behind me isn't she? [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. advil pm® or tylenol pm. the advil pm® guy is spending less time lying awake with annoying aches and pains and more time asleep. advil pm®. the difference is a better night's sleep. patrick dempsy has a strong tie to the city. wish him luck. back to you. >> clayton: lack of security. and so we thought according to the new york post security officials that were sacked after the release of the benghazi report are still on the government's pay roll and will be back to school with work. here is the reaction lieutenant cornel tony schafer. when you heard the report that came out around christmas, what did you think? it is an extended montyepython skit. the idea here is that these people are not held accountable . this is but one more layier clayton of regarding the whole ben
are disenfranchised by new sets of law, but just a decade before two decades before your something like 1500 african-americans serving across the country at various levels is local, state and federal offices. 14 congressmen, two senators, lieutenant governors. it's really powerful. for the kenai tremendous opportunity and promise in the future and so much changes so quickly. it makes me think about her own moment and wonder how fragile is progress. >> when i was at the newberry, i was looking for michelle obama's ancestors. one other thing as kerry says whether i could find out who is the first person in the family to vote. it was a hopeless quest. but i was in the newberry library, a lovely library in chicago and i stumbled across a book that had voter registrations from the 1860s from north carolina. and i look do not book and no jumpers. and i thought it my father, he's from north carolina. otherwise, my great great great grandfather, who in 1867 40 years old, two years free registered to vote. he was approved as a voter.
you do anything, a law, with a carbon tax or a cap-and-trade program or through some other mechanism that can actually give people a sense of what our tech choices are instead of having people say maybe scientists have something in an act or not unceremoniously. small steps to provide us with opportunities to change the dialogue. >> we at "usa today" gallup poll that came back on monday. a third of republicans, not a nurse when they asked their ideology call themselves moderates or liberals. a third of the party. in this particular poll for the first time, republicans lost enthusiasm advantage in the presidential race in the reason was because declining enthusiasm. so there's not a republican in washington who describe themselves as a moderate or liberal, but the third of republicans in the country do. >> just to allays this point, rahm emanuel i say the republican party steeply provided to turn this small government land and no government land. there is a truth that not far. i am told we are now at our time. i want mickey to come back with a few closing comments. a part of this but
into law. if you're among republicans is if you reach an agreement now and agree to tax increases, the spending cuts will get undone or never will be followed through on. that's one of the things that has held back talks, because republicans are skeptical that democrats will follow through. host: charles is on the independent line from colorado. caller: good morning, steve. i listened to it the myopic dogma in this segment over and over. the only people i can blame on this are the american people. the people who sit here and listen to these guys that are extremists and and they vote him into office -- them into office. i hear people say let's get rid of epa. if you look at how much epa takes out of our budget, that's like worrying about nothing gary people need to turn off the tv and start studying more. crack some books. look at economic spirit trickle-down economics does not work. name a country where it has worked? maybe estonia. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course.
to be signed into law this is seen as retaliation for a new u.s. law that imposes travel and economic restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. >>> it was a black christmas? initial holiday numbers not very good. a report from master card said holiday sales growth slowed by more than half this year, and the weakest holiday shopping season since 2008. the report said shoppers were not in a subpoenai inspending m of the fiscal cliff threat and hurricane sandy. >>> box office gold for les miserables. it blew away all expectations. raking in $18 million on opening day. strong number one. and number two, jangle on chains, starring jamie fox and leonardo decap icaprio. and then the hob bot, parental guidance and jack reacher. >>> in the next half hour, we'll preview some of the top picks with christopher john farley of speak easy. "the wall street journal's" culture website. we'll look ahead to the movies. >>> ahead on "starting point," we showed you the winter weather in some parts of the country. the other danger? tornadoes. a man rolling the camera as he started to steer his family
, won't be over it very long, you know the way washington works. two weeks in they can pass a law retroactively and roll back the tax things but doesn't appear someh somehow new year's eve and january 1st scares these guys into doing anything. >> the grand bargain of tax reform seems a distant thought. whether it comes before or after, how do you think they will do a deal? >> reporter: it appears the white house has made a decision they won't try for a big deal anymore. whether that's a good political idea or not, we'll see. they could try to do one more big deal, try to see if politically they get the republicans to either say yes to them or refuse them one more time in trying to gain higher political ground. at this point, they seem to be convinced the republicans aren't going to work with them so try to come up with a quote minimal deal creating that line at $250,000 in income and trying to extend those tax rates and basically postpone the fight until february. peter brought up the debt ceiling, secretary geithner said we have hit it essentially. they can move money around and
is the criminal. >> reporter: the powerful gun lobby and its allies insist gun laws aren't the answer. they want more guns in the hands of good guys. >> if it's crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our schools to protect our children, then call me crazy. >> people resisted having weapons on airplanes. but i oversaw the federal air marshals, and it's a deterrent. >> reporter: legislation will have to waited for the new congress to get settled in, but the debate is already underway. >> trying to prevent school shootings? schools without talking about guns is like stopping lung cancer without addressing cigarettes. >> this problem runs deep and wide. >> reporter: outside of atlanta, gun owners are voting with their wallets, buying up weapons while they still can. >> i don't think it's ever a wrong time to protect yourself and -- and exercise your second amendment rights. >> reporter: but some 30 miles away from the connecticut shooting scene, gun owners were surrendering their arms for cash. it's one of a number of gun buyback programs around the country. this event netted 64 fire
in afghanistan that works on police training for the afghan forces. he worked in law enforcement and was a u.s. military veteran. suzanne. >> all right. condolences to his family. thank you, barbara. appreciate it. >>> it is hard to believe, but 2013 less than a week away. we're going to look back at all the science breakthroughs of the last year coming up. ♪ everybody well don't you know it's me now? ♪ ♪ yeah who's it, who's it huh? ♪ ♪ willy's back with a brand new beat now, ♪ ♪ yeah doin' it doin' it up! ♪ heyyy yeah, tryin' to bite my style! ♪ ♪ heyyy yeah, how you like me now? ♪ ♪ na na na na na na na na ♪ and everybody go uh! campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> starbucks is now pushing politicians to avoid the massive spending cuts due to go into effect six dames from now. the ceo is asking employees at the d.c. area stores to write "come together" on their coffee cups tomorrow and friday. in a letter to
in places like california and hawaii because of land use laws from the 1960's. second, if you look to the community reinvestment act, if you think that is the cause of the bubble, you have to explain why there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over l
is causing it and why it's so important to find a cure. >>> let's start this half hour with a law signed by russia's president overnight that bans adoptions by u.s. citizens. agonizing news for american couples looking to start or expand their families. nbc's michelle kosinski is here this morning with more. >> it more russian children are adopted here in america than any other country. we're talking tens of thousands of country over the last 20 years or so. as of this morning, russia has just made this illegal effective immediately in a sort of diplomatic dispute with the u.s. that seems to have very little to do with the children. they're like any proud parent. americans posting their stories of adopting russian children, showing their happiness on the internet. >> so we're leaving. >> this family traveled to russia in 2007 overjoyed to adopt ben. >> you've gotten to be a big boy. >> a head full of hair. >> i know. like daddy's. >> a relationship that took nearly a year to get started. >> it's a million pieces of paper. you laugh about it, but it really is quite an intensive process. >
consumer law center and the author of several publications including "student loan lot," and "the guide to surviving student debt." next to her is the n.y.u. chief enrollment officer. he is in charge of the office of financial aid. so, to get into the solutions oriented discussion we're going to have today, the problem is something i think everybody is very familiar with, but i think sometimes google's of the sale is an interesting harbinger. if you type in student loan, it will suggest student loan forgiveness. if you type in student debt, it will suggest student debt crisis. this is a problem many people worry about, whether it is at 3:00 a.m. when they cannot sleep or in the hospital staring at their new baby and wondering, how will i do this the way i want to, the way maybe my parents were able to manage in a previous generation. the average student graduates with $26,600 worth of debt and over 13% default within three years. we have more outstanding student at than auto or credit- card debt at this point. many may think it is good that we have more student debt than credit-card deb
in their own pockets or they become lobbyists. this secreted a law that they should not be able to become lobbyists for a few years sucker they leave congress or senate. they need to just bring america back up. if it would bring more jobs back to america, then we would have more taxes to be collected. host: more in the financial times this morning. capitol hill plays out a cliffhanger is the headline. the right the mood of the members matches the state of negotiations, l tempered, resentful and having their christmas breaks interrupted by another partisan budget impasse and in no frame of mind a compromise. we are talking about the senate negotiating a on the air. caller: thank you for taking my call. i am going to join the democrats, at least most of them, i hope. i am so disgusted and so disheartened. i feel that the republicans are being obstructionists on purpose. that is obvious. anyhow, they need to -- it is not about parties and politics anymore. it comes down to looking out for america. ok? host: why do you think they are being obstructionist? what do they have to gain by doing th
for law enforcement. gregg: and trace is next with the remarble story of a little boy who touched lots of hearts after the connecticut school shooting. >> when i heard about sandy hook, i just felt really bad for all the kids who had died. >> i wasn't surprised that he wanted to do something, i was just surprised that he followed through with it, and it made me really proud. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at over 500 branches nationwide. so when you call or visit, you can ask for a name you know. because personal service starts with a real person. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our support teams are nearby, ready to help. it's no wonder so many investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood suga
the president needs to do. there is nothing he has to sign. as a matter of law the law changes in january and taxes go up. president doesn't have to do anything. he can sit back and as taxes go up on everybody including that 1% that he has been after, nothing has been done on spending. sequestration could be rolled back with retro activity where the president thinks he is better shape on spending in january. patti ann: alan? >> you forget the president offered boehner a deal to keep taxes keep the bush tax rate on 98% of the americans. keep those tax rates where they are. not raise taxes and boehner rejected that. he had opportunity -- excuse me, i'm still talking. he has opportunity now to do exactly what the republicans say they want and boehner rejects it. >> it is beyond revenue. it is about spending. that is our problem. >> you can stop going over cliff first of the year. >> what about spending that got us in bind we're in? none of the revenue that will be generated will make a dent in our spending especially the 6 trillion the president has --. patti ann: brad, democrats are arguing
, then say, how can you be in a congress? who got arrested? you violated the laws. and i said, they were proud laws. their customs, they were tradition and we wanted america to be better. we wanted america to live it to the declaration of independence, live up to or create them make real our democracy. take it off of people and make it real. so when i got arrested the first time, i felt free. i felt liberated and today more than ever before, i feel free and liberated. you know, abraham lincoln 150 years ago freed the slaves. but it took the modern-day civil rights movement to free and liberate a nation. [applause] now i know some of you are asking, where did you get the name "across that bridge"? where did you get the title from? life lessons and a vision for change. take a few short years ago that this is an election year. hundreds of dozens of million people from virginia to texas. could not register to the based on the color of their skin. people stood in line. we take a state like the state of mississippi in 1963, 1964, 1965 and the voting age population more than 450,000, but only 1
. they shared with him the he was comfortable that these guys. at columbia law school, they were very good guys. it is true that obama did his best. when i interview president obama in the oval office, he talked about the supporters in new york. but he started to make that transition in his long arc of his search for home. she was starting to happen and beenu mahmood was very perceptively seen that happen. >> host: why did the presidency president in new york after graduating from columbia? >> guest: he was trying to get a job wherever he could. he applied for a job in chicago after washington was elected mayor there. he didn't get anything. so the best he could do was stay in new york. he wouldn't want to go back to honolulu. he didn't have anyplace else. so he stayed there and as he put it, you try to make money for yourself and get a job. it is sort of a magazine or consulting firm called business international. for that year, he doesn't really like it there, but that is the period when they talk a lot. it is the period when he met genevieve. >> host: so david maraniss, going back to the quo
at conception. but that's not the law. okay? >> and if other people don't believe that, you're tolerant of their views? right? >> and the point is nobody's leaving the country. we have a wide spectrum in america, and we have to work for the common good. and that means sometimes what i mean being co-belligerent. for instance i don't agree with everything that the national organization of women supports. but when they are opposing abortion -- not abortion but pornography that objectifies a body i'm going to go belligerent with them. so i don't happen to agree with everything that my gay friends believe, but when they end to end aids i'm a co-belligerent. we've given millions to fight aids around the world. and we work with both gays straights, i can work with an atheist, a mormon i can work with a muslim a baptist, buddhist, joy, that's one of the issues that we have to work on. the work on what can -- >> the important thing is going to be what you said earlier in terms of same-sex marriage. you have to be tolerant of other people's views. so if they differ with you with
that mean? freedom of information law. this is information the general public could have obtained on their own. the paper obtained it. finally, listen to this, there is a provision within foia and it says if the government feels request is unduly intrusive or invase i have privacy it could be denied. it was not denied. they gave it to the paper. they published it. jamie: they did not publish all the information. the some information government did not feel was appropriate to release. let me pose this to you, rebecca, this is policy issue rather than legal question. one of the people wrote me back, a friend of mine in texas, a former black hawk pilot, female friend of mind, please publish my address, let robbers know i'm well-armed and locked and loaded. >> that is what she said because she can protect herself. what about all the citizens who have absolute legal right to bear arms who are now basically outed for criminals to come in to attempt to get their firearms? because on the black market, firearms are extremely profitable. i just think it was, irresponsible of the newspaper.
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